Motorcycle Riding And Neck Pain

It is curious that many people suffering from neck problems intuit that riding a motorcycle will not sit well. Really, is it bad for the neck to ride a motorcycle? What is the relationship between motorcycle and neck pain? The answer has several nuances. Indeed, riding a motorcycle can be harmful to the neck although it does not have to be in all circumstances. Let’s explain it in parts.

Motorcycle Riding And Neck PainWind: This is one of the main factors that make the bike a possible enemy of our neck. The neck is very prepared to withstand the forces that push the head from behind forwards but not for the inertias that push the head from front to back. This is because strong and well positioned muscles are the extensor muscles, which are behind. These muscles cannot protect us when the wind comes from the face because the wind pushes in the same direction of action of these muscles. Generally the wind face is bad for the neck, but can be less. On the one hand, a good dome can protect us from the inertia of the wind on the head, diverting the direction of the air. On the other hand, in the motorcycles in which we are more thrown forward, the posture can partly offset the forces. As the body is leaning forward, the weight of the head and hull, together with the position of the wind, the forces that carry the head back are smaller. This way the neck would not suffer so much a prior, but the posture in hyperextension have other problems. The posture to be adopted causes the muscles to become fatigued before, and that can be disturbed after a while as the joints are in a more forced posture. On the other hand, if we are sitting very erect on a motorcycle with little or no dome (such as a field bike, for example) and catch speed, the wind will directly injure our neck. The forces that carry the head back are smaller. This way the neck would not suffer so much a prior, but the posture in hyperextension have other problems. The posture to be adopted causes the muscles to become fatigued before, and that can be disturbed after a while as the joints are in a more forced posture. On the other hand, if we are sitting very erect on a motorcycle with little or no dome (such as a field bike, for example) and catch speed, the wind will directly injure our neck. The forces that carry the head back are smaller. This way the neck would not suffer so much a priori, but the posture in hyperextension have other problems. The posture to be adopted causes the muscles to become fatigued before, and that can be disturbed after a while as the joints are in a more forced posture. On the other hand, if we are sitting very erect on a motorcycle with little or no dome (such as a field bike, for example) and catch speed, the wind will directly injure our neck. The posture to be adopted causes the muscles to become fatigued before, and that can be disturbed after a while as the joints are in a more forced posture. On the other hand, if we are sitting very erect on a motorcycle with little or no dome (such as a field bike, for example) and catch speed, the wind will directly injure our neck. The posture to be adopted causes the muscles to become fatigued before, and that can be disturbed after a while as the joints are in a more forced posture. On the other hand, if we are sitting very erect on a motorcycle with little or no dome (such as a field bike, for example) and catch speed, the wind will directly injure our neck.

There are accessories for the helmet that cushion the tendency to neck extension by the wind but few motorists use them because it limits mobility and is uncomfortable. It can be an option if we are going through an injury and we have to get the bike.

 The bumps: The bike rolls on the ground and all impacts are transmitted to our body and lastly to the neck. Even walking, every foot impact on the ground is an energy that our body has to cushion. In this cushion the whole body participates, from the feet and knees to the column. To a greater or lesser extent your part will touch. The impact that our neck will suffer depends on the type of terrain we ride on, the cushioning of the bike and the postures we adopt. If we have a recent injury, getting out on a motorcycle through the bumpy field will not be a good idea.

The helmet: The helmets are usually light but somewhat heavy and increase the size of our head. This causes the inertias that are generated in the head to react more on the neck.

The stance of the arms: The arms are in front of the body, whatever the bike is. The further away, the more cervical muscles will suffer. It really is not a problem in itself; it is rather a fatigue factor. If we are long in this position the neck muscles will become tired, suffer contractures and secondarily can damage the joints of the neck. If we are in good shape, the posture is not very extreme and we limit the time we stay so often, it does not have to be a detrimental factor by itself. Speaking of extreme postures, custom bikes with exaggerated handlebars can be very nice but they are nonsense for the health of the neck and shoulders.

 The time we are on the bike: The more forced the postures, the less time we will hold in them before they appear discomfort. Try to change position on the bike from time to time to relieve tension in the joints and let the muscles rest.

In short, riding a motorbike can damage the neck in some circumstances: If we have is account explained, the risk can be minimized and that enjoy the bike is not a problem. If you have suffered a cervical injury, all this must be taken into account and it may be advisable to park the bike for a while while recovering.

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